Protected: Uncommon Relations – Part 4

There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

WHY WRITE A PREQUEL?

Isn’t the main work enough without writing a prequel? For most novels, yes, the story satisfies its purpose so why write a prequel? Why? Because for other novels, a seemingly minor …

Natural and Supernatural in fiction – a buzz at 0.99

The compelling aspect when reading supernatural plots is that odd things happen within a context of ordinary, natural life. If the whole world is ghostly, there is nothing scary or unsettling …

Recent review on this reader website

My little review (also on Amazon and Goodreads) *****

I enjoyed that the word ‘umpteen’ appeared in the first chapter, reminding me of how older relatives used to talk when I was a child in the 70s and 80s. I knew then that the prose was going to be lovely and fitting. Billy, aged five is excited about his cousin Kenneth staying. He turns out to be a real bully – his parents believe anything he says. I noticed his character so why didn’t they, even when Kenneth’s eyelashes were compared to a camel Billy’s dad commented ‘Displays calm, the camel, but they can turn nasty’ (quote from the book). This was a great piece of foreshadowing. Billy’s only saviour is his neighbour who has a fancy Russian knife (for display purposes, but looking at it made Billy feel brave). Not only is Billy’s life intruded by his cousin, but World War II is about to start. The reader learns from Billy’s observations of his parents how scary this is going to be. Billy is evacuated early on, his journey to the country is so enthralling, children wondering where their next meal is coming from – and some sharing out food. The heartbreaking bit when Billy is the last to be chosen. Gas masks, uncles returning from Dunkirk, it’s all in there. The most heartwarming bit for me was Billy’s stay with Mrs Youlden, her two younger children and another evacuee Alan. Billy has never experienced poverty before or been cold and dirty but here, he is loved and makes a true friend with Alan. Reading this book was like going back in time to childhood.

I really enjoyed this book

Author

books@rosalindminett.com
Rosalind is the author of the WW2 trilogy, A Relative Invasion, and the satirical short story collections, Me-Time Tales and its companion volume Curious Men. She lives in SW England where she enjoys theatre, Art and scenic walks. Her career as a psychologist means all her writing is character-led. She relishes creating characters of all ages. Even her humorous work has a dark edge.
Rosalind Minett